Sunday, July 31, 2011


Toronto's Sherbourne Common park integrates public art with the stormwater infrastructure. - Toronto's Sherbourne Common park integrates public art with the stormwater infrastructure. | Nicola Betts

LISA ROCHON: CITYSPACE

Sherbourne Common: Clean, Green, Brainy and Blue

From Saturday's Globe and Mail

Sherbourne Common marks the end of the park. Or, at least, the end of the conventional park. Here is a beguiling landscape, injected with rays of electric blue at night, that sits atop a vast, brainy infrastructure. Below a splash pad, where kids frolic by day, polluted water from Lake Ontario pours through ultraviolet cleansing tanks before being pumped up through celebratory water sculptures. A park of this kind may be a first for Canada and even North America, but it surely will not be the last.

Thursday, July 21, 2011

2011 Walk21 Conference, Oct 3-5

http://www.walk21.com/vancouver/

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Montr├ęal — The Neighbourhood Revived
National Film Board 1974

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Trevor Boddy — An Appreciation of
Bing Thom in Canadian Architect

A look at Bing Thom's career presents an argument for an oft-overlooked and misunderstood West Coast architect.

"… one of the most underpublished key Canadian buildings of the past few years (is) Bing Thom Architects’ (BTA) Sunset Community Centre for a park on Vancouver’s south Main Street, near the Punjabi Market.

Weddings in the Punjab crucially include a parade of bride and groom around the village or neighbourhood, and local families were forced to book wedding halls in Surrey, 25 kilometres away,because there was no adequate facility nearby. A large room on Main Street was Thom’s key addition to the standard Vancouver community centre recreation-related program (the half-century string of these buildings are one of Vancouver’s undersung marvels of social integration and healthy living).

Diagonal pedestrian desire paths across the park site informed Sunset’s crossed pair of internal streets, which double as avenues for wedding processions on even the rainiest of days. Thom’s favoured organic forms are evident here and are rationalized by him as being inspired by the flowing forms of silk saris, drifting above the park’s greensward of a summer’s evening."

Monday, July 11, 2011

Walking Home —
The Life and Lessons of a City Builder



Ken Greenberg, author of a new book 'Walking Home' and one of the world's foremost urban designers, shares his passion and methods for rejuvenating neglected cities.








Ken Greenberg, author of a new book 'Walking Home' and one of the world's foremost urban designers, shares his passion and methods for rejuvenating neglected cities. He is photographed in Toronto's Kensington Market May 10, 2011. - Ken Greenberg, author of a new book 'Walking Home' and one of the world's foremost urban designers, shares his passion and methods for rejuvenating neglected cities. He is photographed in Toronto's Kensington Market May 10, 2011. | Moe Doiron/The Globe and Mail

Urbane Renewal: a Life in Cities

From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Walking Home: The Life and Lessons of a City Builder

If you’re a native of suburbia (and many millions of us are), it’s easy to feel that the divide between city and suburb has always been there. But that’s not true. With Walking Home, urban designer KenGreenberg shows how much the North American city has changed just within his lifetime – and why. In plain and modest language, he explains some of the great shifts of the past half-century, from the ravaging of downtowns by “urban renewal” right through the present-day renewals of dead industrial lands in places such as Toronto.

Saturday, July 9, 2011



From left, Ken Greenberg, Greenberg Consultants Inc., Ernest Liu, owner of Salad King, Alan Shepard, Provost and Vice President Academic Ryerson University, Kristyn Wong-Tam, councillor for Ward 27, and James Robinson, Executive Director of Downtown Yonge Business Improvement Area - From left, Ken Greenberg, Greenberg Consultants Inc., Ernest Liu, owner of Salad King, Alan Shepard, Provost and Vice President Academic Ryerson University, Kristyn Wong-Tam, councillor for Ward 27, and James Robinson, Executive Director of Downtown Yonge Business Improvement Area | Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail

For City Builders, 

There’s a New Model in Town

SIRI AGRELL URBAN AFFAIRS REPORTER

Globe and Mail, 


If you’re a native of suburbia (and many millions of us are), it’s easy to feel that the divide between city and suburb has always been there. But that’s not true. With Walking Home, urban designer Ken Geenberg shows how much the North American city has changed just within his lifetime – and why. In plain and modest language, he explains some of the great shifts of the past half-century, from the ravaging of downtowns by “urban renewal” right through the present-day renewals of dead industrial lands in places such as Toronto.